Losing your person

You wake up in the morning with reminders that “your person” isn’t there anymore. Their toothbrush isn’t in the holder in the bathroom, their shoes aren’t laying in the middle of the floor, as they usually are. You don’t hear them clear their throat in the morning as they read the news and check their facebook. You don’t smell their soap, or the steam mixed with shampoo from the bathroom shower making its way down the hall. You know they are gone. Why did you just set out a second coffee mug for them? 

 

You get in the car and head out to start your day. You aren’t sure if that light that you just went through was red or green. You can’t remember if you put a napkin in your child’s lunch box or not- and you know if you didn’t, you’ll hear about that later. You lock the door to your car, and head into the office. You are on autopilot. You aren’t even sure how you’re doing this, but you are.

 

Your husband or wife has died. This was your companion, the person you shared your life with. Right now you are not sure of who you are, and you feel confused. This is normal because you have lost a part of yourself. When you experience the death of someone you love, live with, and depend on, feeling disoriented is natural.

 

You are now faced with the difficult but important need to mourn. Mourning is the open expression of your thoughts and feelings regarding the death of your spouse. It is an essential part of healing.It is not something that you have to do alone. Seeking professional assistance and creating a support network are some of the ways that you can help yourself mourn and begin to heal.

 

Resource for this entry are include: greifworks.com